Thursday, 15 October 2015

1760 Jacket & Petticoat - Norah Waugh XXX

Pattern: Diagram XXX, "1760 Jacket" from Norah Waugh, The Cut of Women's Clothes
Fabric: 100% Silk, brick red/orange color. 100% linen for the lining. 100% cotton for the vintage lace trims.
Available on ebay HERE
Available on Etsy HERE
Alterations: Size increased from the original using the "shift" method. I graded up each piece (front, side, back, skirt section) by 5/8", resulting a in an overall garment increase of 3.75". Also, I did not exactly copy the trimming in the original
Measurements of original pattern:
Chest: 35"
Waist: 26"
Torso quite short, definitely petite range. 
Measurements of my reproduction:
Chest: 38"
Waist: 30.5
Torso still slightly shorter than average.
Hem: 39" at front.




~Overview~
This pattern is super simple. No pleats, no robings, no stomacher. As far as 18th century goes, this is about as simple as it gets. Probably the most complex part about it is the lacing tabs inside and the lining stopping at waist level. 

The sleeves are shaped to a curve and are about 3/4 length. I imagine they would look great with high gloves =) 

The closure functions with laces taking most of the strain of the garment, then the front closing with hooks and eyes with decorative tabs. On the original, the tabs appear to actually fasten with each other with little buttons, but I decided I didn't want to do that (and I also didn't have anything on hand to serve as suitable little buttons). I also added modesty panel of matching silk under the hooks/eyes. 

(Below) Showing the modesty panel with big ugly pins. For actual wear, probably some smaller, neater pins ;) lol

  (Below) Spiral lacing with handmade eyelets. You can also see more hand stitching and the hooks/eyes.


(Below) The lacing tabs are stitched straight through to the front by hand. the decorate tabs at the front completely cover those stitching, so it could be done by machine if you choose. The tabs are boning on both sides of the eyelets with 1/4" spring steel.

You can also see some of the padding and manipulation I have to do to modern dress forms in order to give them an 18th century look. I really should whip up a low grade pair of stays to put on my forms, which would make this much easier, lol.



(Below) The tabs are double layer silk. The cotton lace trimming is vintage, though I can't be sure of the age. I got it at an antique store. I stitching on the lace by hand to each tab, then top stitched the tabs to the jacket by hand.

 (Below) The ruching around the hem and the neckline is topstiched on by hand.



~Button Holes~

I did the buttonholes by hand with pearl twist cotton embroidery floss. I would have preferred silk floss, but I didn't have any and didn't want to wait to order something (I don't live anywhere near where you could get any in a store). I have halfway through the first buttonhole when I decided it looked too plain, so I added the simple stem stitch decoration around the buttonhole. I've never done decorative buttonholes before, so I decided not to get too wild on this first attempt.

(Hand buttonholes are still a learning exercise for me).



(Below) The netting isn't part of the garment. Just stuffing I used to fill out the sleeves before picture taking.


~Petticoat~
Comprised of two panels, 58" x 50". The waistline is shaped the meet the different hem heights from the center front and back versus the sides that hand over pocket hoops. the hem is wide, about 4" double folded. The hem is also entirely hand stitched. One of the changes I will do next time is to bring the pleats over further toward the centers. Trying to keep the front smooth that far doesn't really work, because the side width just end up "caving in" toward the center anyway. 



~Finished~
*Be forewarned, there are many, MANY pictures to follow ;) 







The fichu shown is real silk gauze. It's like sewing on spider webs!






























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